English

Who wrote the poem ‘Comrade Napoleon’?

With reference to George Orwell’s ‘The Animal Farm’, answer the following questions:

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With reference to George Orwell’s ‘The Animal Farm’, answer the following questions:

With reference to George Orwell’s ‘The Animal Farm’, answer the following questions:

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One Sunday morning Squealer announced that the hens, who just come in

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

One Sunday morning Squealer announced that the hens, who just come in to lay again, must surrender their eggs.

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One Sunday morning, when the animals assembled to receive their orders,

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

One Sunday morning, when the animals assembled to receive their orders, Napoleon announced that he had decided upon a new policy. “From now onwards Animal Farm would engage in trade with the neighbouring farms: not, of course, for any commercial purpose, but simply in order to obtain certain materials which were urgently necessary.”

(i) Why did the animals need ‘certain materials’?

    What arrangements had Napoleon made to engage in trade with the neighbouring farms?

(ii) Why did Napoleon’s announcement make the animals uneasy? 

(iii) What did Squealer say to the animals to ease their doubts and fears? 

(iv) Who was Mr. Whymper? What had he agreed to do?

     Why had he entered into this agreement with Napoleon?

(v) There was a change in the attitude of the humans towards Animal Farm. Comment on this change. What were the signs and symptoms of this change?

Answer

 (i) • They needed certain materials to construct the windmill

     • Napoleon arranged to sell a stack of hay and part of the current year’s wheat crop.

     • Later on, if they needed more money it would be made up by the sale of eggs for which there was always a market in Willingdon.

 (ii) • Animals were uneasy because Napoleon was violating some of their earliest resolutions.

      • Never to have any dealings with humans

      • Never to engage in trade – never to use money.

(iii) Squealer assured the animals:

     • That the resolution against engaging in trade and using money had never been passed.

     • That they were a bunch of lies that had probably been spread by snowball.

     • That the animals had probably dreamt of such resolutions. Asked if they had any written record of such resolutions – this convinced the animals that they were making          a mistake.

(iv) • Mr. Whymper was a solicitor living in Willingdon

      • To act as intermediary between Animal Farm and the outside world.

      • Shrewd man – realised that Animal Farm would need a broker and that the commissions from this would be worth having.

(v) Humans continued to hate Animal Farm and did not wish it well, but

    • They developed a certain respect for

    • The efficiency with which the animals managed their own affairs.

    • One symptom – they began to call ‘Animal Farm’ by its proper name – ceased to pretend that it was called Manor Farm.

    • The humans stopped supporting Farmer Jones – he had given up all hope of ever getting the farm back and had moved to another part of the town.

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Answer the following questions with reference to Jack London’s, ‘The Call of the Wild’.

Answer the following questions with reference to Jack London’s, ‘The Call of the Wild’.

(i) Why is Buck regarded as the protagonist (the hero) of Jack London’s book ‘The Call of the Wild’?

(ii) After Spitz’s death Buck was made leader of the dog team. In what ways did Buck prove to be better than Spitz in his role as leader of the team?

(iii) Explore the themes of love and loyalty as revealed in the relationship between Buck and Thornton in Jack London’s novel, ‘The Call of the Wild’.

Answer

(i) • The evolution of Buck’s character is the focus of the story.
    • The novel traces his life from the time he is a happy four-year-old basking in the California sun to a tough competitor
    • Buck emerges as a faithful, loyal companion, and finally to the leader of a wolf pack in the wil.
    • Buck is noble, admirable, and shows remarkable loyalty (to Francois and Perrault) and love (for Thornton) - protagonist-like qualities.

(ii) • Good judgement/ quick thinking and quick acting
     • Laying down the law
     • Enforcing the law – making the other dogs follow
     • The team recovered old-time solidarity

(iii) • Buck’s love and loyalty to Thornton is the result of extremities of circumstance – they save each other’s lives on more than one occasion.
      • Thornton saves Buck’s life on different occasions (from death by club/starvation/will to die)
      • Buck in turn saves Thornton’s life when he gets in a bar fight.
     • On another occasion Thornton almost drowns but is again saved by Buck.
     • Thornton wins a huge sum of money by betting Buck can pull an enormous load.
     • Thornton goes in search of gold and a lost cabin with his partners and is killed by natives.
     • Buck seems unable to respond to the call of the wild until after Thornton’s death.
     • This suggests that perhaps his love and loyalty for the man are stronger than his more primeval urges.

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On the other hand, possibly because he divined in Buck a dangerous rival, Spitz never lost

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

On the other hand, possibly because he divined in Buck a dangerous rival, Spitz never lost an opportunity of showing his teeth. He even went out of his way to bully Buck, striving constantly to start the fight which could end only in the death of one or the other. 

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During the four years since his puppyhood he (Buck) had lived the life of a sated aristocrat

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During the four years since his puppyhood he (Buck) had lived the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was ever a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of their insular situation.

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These two disagreed on every point where disagreement was possible

Animal Farm (10)

These two disagreed on every point where disagreement was possible. If one of them suggested sowing a bigger acreage with barley, the other was certain to demand a bigger acreage of oats, and if one of them said that such and such field was just right for cabbages, the other would declare that it was useless for anything except roots.

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How they toiled and sweated to get the hay in

Animal Farm (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

How they toiled and sweated to get the hay in! But their efforts were rewarded, for the harvest was an even bigger success than they had planned. Sometimes the work was hard;...

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Describe Sibia's experience at the Bazaar

Collection of Short Stories (10)

Answer the following questions with reference to Norah Burke’s short story "The Blue Bead"

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So the little girl walked about the streets on her naked feet

Collection of Short Stories (10)

So the little girl walked about the streets on her naked feet, which were red and blue with cold. In her old apron she carried a great many matches, and she had a packet of them in her hand as well.

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Well, Mr. Easton, if you will make me speak first, I suppose I must

Collection of Short Stories (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

"Well, Mr. Easton, if you will make me speak first, I suppose I must. Don't you ever recognize old friends when you meet them in the West?"

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Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace,

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But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
His shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
His wings are clipped and his feet are tied
So he opens his throat to sing.

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Bangle sellers are we who bear

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Bangle sellers are we who bear
Our shining loads to the temple fair...

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Trotter: It’s true, isn’t it, that Jimmy, the child who died

The Mousetrap (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Trotter: It’s true, isn’t it, that Jimmy, the child who died, managed to get a letter posted to you? (He sits at the Right end of the sofa). The letter begged for help - help from this kind young teacher. You never answered that letter.

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Mrs Boyle: I am Mrs Boyle. (She puts down the suitcase)

The Mousetrap (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Mrs Boyle: I am Mrs Boyle. (She puts down the suitcase)

Giles: I’m Giles Ralston. Come in to the fire. Mrs Boyle, and get warm. (Mrs Boyle moves down to the fire.)

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Giles: (Calling) Mollie? Mollie? Mollie? Where are you?

The Mousetrap (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Giles: (Calling) Mollie? Mollie? Mollie? Where are you?
(Mollie enters from the arch Left.)

Mollie: (Cheerfully) Doing all the work you brute. (She crosses to Giles).

Giles: Oh, there you are – leave it all to me. Shall I stoke the Aga?

Mollie: Done.

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Portia: The quality of mercy is not strained

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Portia: The quality of mercy is not strained;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blessed;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:
‘Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown:

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Shylock: To bait fish withal. If it will feed nothing

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

SHYLOCK: To bait fish withal. If it will feed nothing
else, it will feed my revenge. He hath disgraced
me and hindered me half a million, laughed at my
losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation,
thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated
mine enemies—and what’s his reason? I am a Jew.
Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs,
dimensions, senses, affections, passions? Fed with the
same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, healed by the same means,
warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer
as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed?

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Launcelot: But, I pray you, ergo, old man, ergo

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Launcelot: But, I pray you, ergo, old man, ergo,
I beseech you, talk you of young Master Launcelot?

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Ray Douglas Bradbury’s short story: All Summer in a Day

Collection of Short Stories (10)

Answer the following questions with reference to Ray Douglas Bradbury’s short story, ‘All Summer in a Day’

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An angry athlete is an athlete who will make mistakes

Collection of Short Stories (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

An angry athlete is an athlete who will make mistakes, as any coach will tell you. I was no exception. On the first of my three qualifying jumps, I leaped from several inches beyond the take-off board for a foul.

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It had no eyes, ears, nose or mouth

Collection of Short Stories (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

It had no eyes, ears, nose or mouth. It was just a round smooth head - with a school cap on top of it! And that’s where the story should end. But for Mr. Oliver it did not end here.

The torch fell from his trembling hand. He turned and scrambled down the path, running blindly through the trees and calling for help. He was still running towards the school buildings when he saw a lantern swinging in the middle of the path.

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All round the field spectators were gathered Cheering

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

All round the field spectators were gathered Cheering
on all the young women and men Then the final event
of the day was approaching
The last race about to begin.

- Nine Gold Medals, David Roth

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There’s nobody on the house-tops now

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

There’s nobody on the house-tops now---
Just a palsied few at the windows set;
For the best of the sight is, all allow,
At the Shambles’ Gate---- or, better yet,
By the very scaffold’s foot, I trow.

- The Patriot, Robert Browning

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Now tell us what it was all about

Collection of Poems (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

"Now tell us what it was all about".
Young Peterkin, he cries.
And little Wilhelmine looks up
With wonder - waiting eyes,
"Now tell us all about the war,
And what they fought each other for".

- After Blenheim, Robert Southey

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Duke: You hear the learn’d Bellario, what he writes

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Duke: You hear the learn’d Bellario, what he writes:
And here, I take it, is the doctor come.

[Enter Portia, dressed like a Doctor of Laws]

Give me your hand. Come you from old Bellario?

Portia: I did, my lord.

Duke: You are welcome: take your place.
Are you acquainted with the difference
That holds this present question in the court?

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Bassanio: A gentle scroll. - Fair lady, by your leave

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Bassanio: A gentle scroll. - Fair lady, by your leave; [Kissing her]

I come by note, to give and to receive.
Like one of two contending in a prize,
That thinks he hath done well in people’s eyes
Hearing applause and universal shout
Giddy in spirit, still gazing, in a doubt
Whether those peals of praise be his or no;

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Bassanio: To you, Antonio, I owe the most, in money and in love

Merchant of Venice (10)

Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

Bassanio: To you, Antonio,
I owe the most, in money and in love;
And from your love I have a warranty
To unburden all my plots and purposes
How to get clear of all the debts I owe.

Antonio: I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it;

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